Read How

How Does Temperature Affect Density



This topic How Does Temperature Affect Density has not been written yet, if you would like to write about How Does Temperature Affect Density you may do so here.



Similar Questions for How Does Temperature Affect Density from Yahoo Answers

Question
How does a change in temperature affect air density? How does a change in humidity affect air density?
How does a change in temperature affect air density? How does a change in humidity affect air density?

Answer
In the Universal gas equation PV=RT, if you substitute the value of ' V '(volume) as 1/d where 'd ' is the density ,you can show that " d" is inversely proportional to " T " ,the temperature.So,if the temperature of the air becomes more, density of air decreases and vice verse. As molecular weight of water vapour is less than that of dry air,humid air will be lighter than dry air.This means that air density becomes less if the humidity increases in the air.



Question
How does temperature affect the density of a cake?
Hi. I am doing a science project and I chose "How does temperature affect the density of a cake?", as my question. I need a procedure on how to do that. Please also include a materials list with the procedure. Thanks! :) Density= Mass/Volume I want a procedure on how to conduct this experiment. (How does temperature affect the density of a cake?)

Answer
I'm guessing that a frozen cake would be denser than a cake at room temperature. Idea for an experiment: 1) Buy a cake 2) Cut into three pieces 3) Freeze one slice, heat up one slice, and leave one slice at room temperature 4) Put each slice into a containers of water 5) See which one floats the best or if they all float at the same level



Question
How does pressure affect density?
I know how temperature affects density but i don't know how pressure does. Please help me, Thanks :)

Answer
Pressure increases density, to a point. For instance, in the Earth's mantle, density nearer the surface is 3.3 g/cm3, increasing to 6.0 g/cm3 when you reach the mantle-core boundary. The outer core (liquid) remains largely homogeneous with regard to density, but pressure continues to increase (liquids, as a generality, cannot be compressed, this density cannot change). Deep down, when the inner core is reached, the pressure becomes high enough that even the massively intense heat cannot fight against the pressure, and our iron core becomes one solid crystalline mass through a process known as "pressure-freezing" where its the pressure that snaps the atoms into a crystalline structure - even though its temperature remains far above its normal melting point.




Join  | Login