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How did Puritans Define Truth



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Homework Help, need info for Puritans, Revolutionaries, & Transcendentalists?
For each of these what are their: Views of God? How do they define truth? Do they have an optimistic or pessimistic view of life? What are their views of work and worldly success? What is their view of society? Who is their authority? What is their view of education? Do they view man as inherently good, evil, or somewhere in between?

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WOW SOUnDS like my homework LOL UM................................... Um wow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!....................



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Before the American Revolution, slavery extended throughout the United States. In New England it was on a very limited scale. There were household slaves in Boston, who drove the coaches, cooked the dinners, and shared the luxuries of rich houses; and a few were distributed among the most wealthy of the rural population. They were not numerous enough to make the condition a great evil or embarrassment, but quite enough to show its incompatibility with the demonstration of the truth, on which our declaration of Independence is based, that "all men are born equal," and have "an inalienable right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." The slaves in Massachusetts were treated with almost parental kindness. They were incorporated into the family, and each puritan household being a sort of religious structure, the relative duties of master and servant were clearly defined. No doubt the severest and longest task fell to the slave, but in the household of the farmer or artisan, the master and the mistress shared it, and when it was finished, the white and the black, like the feudal chief and his household servant, sat down to the same table, and shared the same viands. No doubt there were hard masters and cruel mistresses, and so there are cruel fathers and exacting mothers: unrestrained power is not a fit human trust. We know an old man, who, fifty years ago, when strict domestic discipline was a cardinal virtue, and "spare the rod and spoil the child" was written on the lintel, was in the unvarying habit, "after prayers" on a Monday morning, of setting his children, boys and girls, nine in number, in a row, and beginning with the eldest, a lad of eighteen, he inflicted an hebdomadal prospective chastisement down the whole line, to the little urchin of three years. And the tradition goes, that the possible transgressions of the week were never underrated--that these were supererogatory stripes for possible sins, or chance misdemeanors!



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Romanticism & Realism :D Emily Dickinson wrote at the tail end of the Romantic period, and even though she was influenced by some of the ideals of Romanticism, is most commonly known as a writer from the Realist era. However, her writing embodies the defining characteristics that are identified with each of these periods. The main characteristic of Romanticism that Emily Dickinson portrays in her writing is the emphases of the importance of Nature to the Romantics. In most of her poems there is some mention or comparison to something found in Nature. In Poem 449, she refers to the moss that covers the names on the graves of the tombstones of “Beauty” and “Truth.” The Puritans believed Nature to be the realm of the devil. By including references to Nature in many of her poems, she was rebelling against the ideals of the Puritan upbringing she had hated so much. Realists are considered to be concerned with poverty, extortion and the negative aspects of life; the harsh realities of life. In Poem 216, Emily uses words to create a metaphor for the Puritan way of life. She reveals how much they distance themselves from others and how living a Puritan way of life is much like walking on earth dead. In many ways, she mocks the wealthy Puritans too. It was their belief to not spend their money, but rather save it. In Poem 216, she is saying that all the money the Puritans obtain in life is spent on their tombstones since they are not allowed to enjoy their riches in this life. Many of her poems deal with death or dying, but this is simply a metaphor to express how bleak life has come to be in the present. Realists were also trying to push for social reform through their writing, hinting at what may happen if reforms do not take place. Emily Dickinson views the Puritan life as a life that oppresses people from the joys it can bring. Puritans try to live a life full of hard work and little pleasure since pleasure is a thing of the devil. She suggests that unless change occurs, people will continue to live a dead, dreary life, lacking in passion and failing to embrace life and to revel in its joys. Emily Dickinson’s writing reflects in many ways, the qualities of the time periods she wrote in; both Romanticism and Realism. These are just a few examples of how her writing reflects the ideals of her generation. Hope this helps :) x




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