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How did Abraham Lincoln Change The World



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Question
Do you think Obama is going to be assassinated if he is elected?
So many of the great leaders who tried to change the world have been murdered; Abraham Lincoln, Bobby Kennedy, Gandhi, JFK, Martin Luther King Jr, and the list sadly goes on. I am personally a supporter of Obama. I have heard a lot of people lately discussing the chance that he may be shot. It's very scary to think about. Whether you support him or not, I'd like to know your opinion on this.

Answer
Are not all candidates and presidents at risk? So are you and I....it's more dangerous to drive a car or drown, than it is to be a president.



Question
What would you write to change the world?
Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela, Ghandi, and Abraham Lincoln... each of these men are notes for changing the world with their speeches. I have to write a five minute speech that if given correctly and publicized right, could be similar to these men. (its just a school project, im not actually going to try and go national or anything :) just a few kids in a classroom) The point is to deliver a message that will change history, and that people will be able to say "at that moment, everything changed." any topic ideas? it can be serious, funny, fiction whatever!

Answer
Want to make an impact? Try this. Leading up to Obama's inaugeration, there was an appeal went out for ideas to present to Presendent Obama on iniatives for America to explore to better their place in the world and the world in general. One of the initiatives was to encourage the instruction of the language of Esperanto in the schools. It actually made it into the top 25 ideas. I have personal knowledge of Esperanto, having assisted in starting a club in my childrens school. Here is an excerp from http://education.change.org/actions/view/study_esperanto_10_minutes_a_day_and_become_a_world_citizen "Esperanto is a neutral, international language, created to be a bridge in between different cultures and peoples. Besides being politically and culturally neutral, it is the easiest language to learn on Earth. While english can be learned in 10 years, Esperanto can be learn in 4 MONTHS. It is spoken by over 10 million people, in every corner of the globe. It has thousands of books written on it, hundreds of songs, newspapers, magazines and it is the quickest way to connect with the World. Study Esperanto for 10 minutes a day. In 4 MONTHS, you will be an expert, able to talk to anyone who speaks Esperanto around the world with perfection. In 4 MONTHS, you can become a citizen of the world. ...You can learn Esperanto on the internet. There is no need for a teacher." Teachers can certainly be found by the way. Check my sites listed below. And here is a shot of reality from some of my other postings on Answers. "$600 million+ USD spent yearly on translation services at the UN (six official languages) and a similar amount in the EU says, sooner or later something is going to change, and this is the cheapest and most effective, proven alternative. All of this is money that can go to better uses. Can you think of a way for the UN and EU to spend 1.2 billion yearly to good effect? I bet you can." Further, if you don't think Esperanto is making headway, check this. In a recent reprint of the Unua Libro (first book), editor Gene Keyes said that when he first started the project in 2000, he did a search for Esperanto on Google and it yielded over 1 million hits. At the completion of his task in February of 2007, the same search yielded over 34 million hits. Out of curiosity, after I had read that I did the same search and it yielded over 39.2 million hits. That's up over 5 million in two months. So it's growing. Slowly (or maybe not so slowly!) Obviously not everyone will find a use for it, and that's fine. However for those that take the time and bother to search out the other users, it's worth it. Of course searching out other uses gets easier with each passing day. Personally I have friends all over the world. Friends I wouldn't have had with out Esperanto. Some have the opinion that the language is impractical and awkward. The two million plus (as of 1995) people that use it says it's not impractical. Two million was considered the functionally fluent level (IE: able to get by in the necessary elements when travelling) in 1995. Since 1995 the Internet has grown by leaps and bounds, and Esperanto right along with it. As for awkward, well I don't agree, but then anything that you start might be considered awkward until you get the practice in that you need. Wikipedia hosts more than 250 different languages. Esperanto ranks 22nd in the most numerous articles category. More than these languages to name a few. 23 Slovak 24 Danish 25 Indonesian http://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/List_of_Wikipedias NOBODY has to give up their mother tongue, nor should they. Esperanto as an auxiliary language however would be wonderful. I encourage everybody to research and draw their own conclusions. Ĝis!



Question
Barack Obama as proof that the United States has made progress toward Abraham Lincoln’s goal?
In the Gettysburg Address , Abraham Lincoln tied the nation’s birth to the ideals of the Declaration of Independence. From November, 1863, up to the present the United States has struggled to realize those ideals. Progress toward them was uneven, and at times the nation regressed. Yet many point to the election of Barack Obama as proof that the United States has made progress toward Lincoln’s goal. WHAT'S YOUR OPINION?

Answer
The Revolution lives on in the hearts and minds of the people of the USA. I've watched the USA from this side of the pond (UK) grow into a mature and advanced democracy which includes all of the people all of the time. The new or second wave of the Revolution started in the 1950s and rolled on into the present era when Black Americans (now usually called African-Americans) rose up and with the Constitution at their head, began the force for change. I'm not sure of the year, but when I was a young man (teen) the now world famous American Heroine Rosa Parks USA, drew attention to the plight of Black folks in America, http://www.yellowcakewalk.net/2007-03-31/Rosaparks.jpg Here in UK we have never ever had segregation of any kind and knew nothing about it until WW2 when White American forces stationed here began demanding it. Winston Churchill was absolutely furious and called the American military to order - by Royal Command - no segregation here in UK. I cannot emphasise that too much. The American people have shown the world the way forward. I cannot express to you just how important it is. The Battle Standard of Liberty http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm_imE1a37Q CHANGE In truth, change comes over time. In my youth, here in UK, there was a great deal of open racism not just directed against Blacks, who were few in number, but against the Irish and other non-UK citizens etc. What happens in reality is that the people of the past grow old and die and the new generation takes up the torch of freedom and races forward holding it aloft on high. I have noticed this in my life time (b1941 London UK). People are many times more tolerant now than they were. When I was a child UK was governed by Victorians and Edwardian - these were people of the previous (19thC) who had hard ideas of how things should be based upon their rule of the then British Empire. This all went rapidly starting in the early 1950s and by the early 1960s it was no more (or very little of it left). It's easy to forget that Winston Churchill was a Victorian who was already of near pensionable age when he became Prime Minister in c1940 WW2. When he died in c1963 an entire era died with him and we then became of the 20thC but we had a long way to go. America is the torch bearer for Freedom - never forget that. The nearest equivalent in the EU is France and the two revolutions are connected by one man, LaFayette. But that's another story. QUAKER




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